‘Ciencia ficción’

Darwin y la tragedia griega

 

Tratando del lenguaje de OSMNS y refiriéndose a expresiones como selección natural, lucha por la vida y otras semejantes, Stanley Edgar Hyman escribe:

 

In fact, these terms are much more than metaphors. They people the world of nature with protagonists and antagonists where previously we had seen only a solitary cactus or a growing seed. Moreover, the dramatic action they summon up is tragic. In Gilbert Murray’s terms, the basic ritual stages of tragedy are agon or contest, sparagmos or tearing apart, then anagnorisis or discovery and epiphany or joyous showing forth of the resurrected protagonist. Darwin’s struggle for existence is clearly Murray’s agon and sparagmos, and his natural selection or survival of the fittest, anagnorisis and epiphany. For the final exultation that the Greeks felt at the affirmation of Reliving Dionysus, Darwin substitutes a quieter tragic satisfaction.He writes:

When we reflect on this struggle, we may console ourselves with the full belief, that the war of nature is not incessant, that no fear is felt, that death is generally prompt, and that the vigorous, the healthy, and the happy survive and multiply.” The Origin concludes: “Thus, from the war of nature, from famine and death, the most exalted object which we are capable of conceiving, namely, the production of the higher animals, directly follows. There is grandeur in this view of life….


De hecho, estos términos son mucho más que metáforas. Ellos llenan a la naturaleza de protagonistas y antagonistas donde antes habíamos visto solamente un cactus solitario o una semilla que crece. Por otra parte, la acción dramática que convocan es trágica. En términos de Gilbert Murray, las etapas rituales básicas de la tragedia son agon o confrontación, sparagmos o lucha, anagnórisis o descubrimiento y la epifanía o final feliz, mostrando finalmente al protagonista resucitado. La lucha por la existencia de Darwin  es claramente agon y sparagmos de Murray, y su selección natural o supervivencia de los más aptos, son respectivamente anagnórisis y epifanía. Para la exaltación final que los griegos sentían en la afirmación de revivir a Dionisio, Darwin sustituye una más tranquila trágica satisfacción. Él escribe:

Cuando reflexionamos sobre esta lucha nos podemos consolar con la completa seguridad de que la guerra en la naturaleza no es incesante, que no se siente ningún miedo, que la muerte es generalmente rápida y que el vigoroso, el sano, el feliz, sobrevive y se multiplica.

Y OSMNS termina:

Thus, from the war of nature, from famine and death, the most exalted object which we are capable of conceiving, namely, the production of the higher animals, directly follows. There is grandeur in this view of life,

Referencia

DARWIN THE DRAMATIST [1]

Stanley Edgar Hyman [2]

The Centennial Review of Arts & Science

Vol. 3, No. 4, 1859-1959: Darwin-Marx Centennial (FALL 1959), pp. 364-375

 

The Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection, or the Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life appeared in 1859, and immediately caught the imagination of the world.

The first edition sold out on the day of publication, and the second shortly after. Within a few years most of the thinking world was convinced[3] of the evolution of species, as it had not been by Buffon, Lamarck, Darwin’s grandfather Erasmus, Robert Chambers’ Vestiges of Creation, or anyone else. It has rarely been doubted that this enormous effect was achieved by the power of scientific argument, that is, by the book’s rhetorical organization[4]. This was certainly Darwin’s view[5]. He begins the book’s final chapter: “As this whole volume is one long argument.” One of Darwin’s latest biographers, Sir Arthur Keith, in Darwin Revalued, best states the prevailing view: “In the Origin he had assembled such a solid mass of observation” that conviction followed inescapably. There can be no doubt that the book’s rhetorical effectiveness is great.

Darwin states his theories simply and plausibly[6], bolsters them with a great deal of convincing evidence (beginning close to home with domestic animals) and scrupulously notes the difficulties and puzzles remaining. Yet the problem remains. The evidence to establish the idea of evolution by natural selection inductively was not really available in 1859[7], and many of Darwin’s processes[8] turn out on closer examination to be plausible hypotheses[9], and his causes tautologies[10]. Nor does the vehemence of the reaction pro and con suggest the characteristic effect of a scientific demonstration.

 

I

 

I would submit that The Origin of Species caught the imagination of its time as a dramatic poem, and a dramatic poem of a very special sort. This view would certainly have surprised Darwin. He was under no illusions about his literary powers, and although he worked quite hard at the writing and rewriting of this book, he saw its prose as “incredibly bad.” [11] His effort was to produce the straightest possible piece of factual writing, and he was only dissuaded by the publisher, John Murray, from calling the book An Abstract of an Essay on the Origin of Species. It is the judgment of a popular textbook that Darwin’s work “cannot be said to belong to literature, if in the definition of literary work is presupposed an effort toward artistic expression.”

Theodore Baird, whose “Darwin and the Tangled Bank” is one of the few efforts I know to correct this conventional estimate, boldly claims that the Origin is not only a work of literature, but “the complicated literary expression known as tragedy.” It is here that any literary consideration should begin. The Origin is much less overtly dramatistic than the Journal of Researches, with the act-scene fitnesses of the earlier book here confined mostly to the great historical pageant of palaeontology, as when Darwin notes that the geological strata mark “only an occasional scene, taken almost at hazard, in an ever slowly changing drama.” The key term in the Origin is “the struggle for existence.” Darwin explains:

In looking at Nature, it is most necessary to keep the foregoing considerations always in mind—never to forget that every single organic being may be said to be striving to the utmost to increase in numbers; that each lives by a struggle at some period of its life; that heavy destruction inevitably falls either on the young or old, during each generation or at recurrent intervals.

All through the book, he refers to “a constant struggle going on,” “the constantly-recurring Struggle for Existence,” “victory in the battle for life,” and so on. From this struggle comes “natural selection,” or, in Herbert Spencer’s more vivid phrase that Darwin adopted, “the survival of the fittest.” Darwin was quite aware that all these terms were ‘metaphoric, a heightening of much less dramatic processes. He writes of “struggle for existence”:

 

I should premise that I use this term in a large and metaphorical sense including dependence of one being on another, and including (which is more important) not only the life of the individual, but success in leaving progeny. Two canine animals, in a time of dearth, may be truly said to struggle with each other which shall get food and live. But a plant on the edge of a desert is said to struggle for life against the drought, though more properly it should be said to be dependent on the moisture. A plant which annually produces a thousand seeds, of which only one of an average comes to maturity, may be more truly said to struggle with the plants of the same and other kinds which already clothe the ground. The mistletoe is dependent on the apple and a few other trees, but can only in a far-fetched sense be said to struggle with these trees, for, if too many of these parasites grow on the same tree, it languishes and dies. But several seedling mistletoes, growing close together on the same branch, may more truly be said to struggle with each other. As the mistletoe is disseminated by birds, its existence depends on then, and it may methodically be said to struggle with other fruit-bearing plants, in tempting the birds to devour and thus disseminate its seeds. In these several senses, which pass into each other, I use for convenience’ sake the general tetra of Struggle for Existence.

 

He writes similarly of “natural selection”:

 

In the literal sense of the word, no doubt, natural selection is a false term; but whoever objected to chemists speaking of the elective affinities of the various elements?—and yet an acid cannot strictly be said to elect the base with which it in preference combines. It has been said that I speak of natural selection as an active power or Deity; but who objects to an author speaking of the attraction of gravity as ruling the movements of the planets? Everyone knows what is meant and is implied by such metaphorical expressions; and they are almost necessary for brevity.

 

In fact, these terms are much more than metaphors. They people the world of nature with protagonists and antagonists where previously we had seen only a solitary cactus or a growing seed. Moreover, the dramatic action they summon up is tragic. In Gilbert Murray’s terms, the basic ritual stages of tragedy are agon or contest, sparagmos or tearing apart, then anagnorisis or discovery and epiphany or joyous showing forth of the resurrected protagonist. Darwin’s struggle for existence is clearly Murray’s agon and sparagmos, and his natural selection or survival of the fittest, anagnorisis and epiphany. For the final exultation that the Greeks felt at the affirmation of Reliving Dionysus, Darwin substitutes a quieter tragic satisfaction. He writes:

 

When we reflect on this struggle, we may console ourselves with the full belief, that the war of nature is not incessant, that no fear is felt, that death is generally prompt, and that the vigorous, the healthy, and the happy survive and multiply.” The Origin concludes: “Thus, from the war of nature, from famine and death, the most exalted object which we are capable of conceiving, namely, the production of the higher animals, directly follows. There is grandeur in this view of life….

 

We realize that this dramatic and tragic vision of life comes from Darwin, rather than from his subject matter, when we see how undramatic most contemporary formulations of natural selection are. A typical one is that of George Gaylord Simpson in The Meaning of Evolution in 1949: “In the modern theory natural selection is differential reproduction, plus the complex interplay in such reproduction of heredity, genetic variation, and all the other factors that affect selection and determine its results.” Darwin was aware of differential reproduction as early as his draft for the Origin in 1844, but always within a larger context of struggle: a fleeter fox would survive better and “rear more young,” but “the less fleet ones would be rigidly destroyed.”

 

The archetypal image of the Origin is the war of nature, an image Darwin at first believed he had borrowed from Alphonse de Candolle. The 1841 outline for the book begins the section on “Natural Selection”: “De Candolle’s war of nature.—seeing contented face of nature,—may be well at first doubted.”

 

These notes are amplified in the 1844 essay into: “De Candolle, in an eloquent passage, has declared that all nature is at war, one organism with another, or with external nature. Seeing the contented face of nature, this may at first be well doubted; but reflection will inevitably prove it is too true.”

When Darwin had to choose a few pages from his manuscript to accompany Wallace’s paper in the historic presentation of the new theory to the Linnean Society in 1858, he began with that passage which he clearly recognized as the heart of his message. By the time the passage appeared in the Origin the next year, Darwin had recognized that De Candolle had no patent on the war of nature, and lumped him in with others. The important thing now was tearing off the pacific mask that life wears, and Darwin writes of the illusion concealing the tragic reality like a Melville narrator:

 

We behold the face of nature bright with gladness, toe often see superabundance of food; we do not see or we forget, that the birds which are idly singing round us mostly live on in-sects or seeds, and are thus constantly destroying life; or we forget how largely these songsters, or their eggs, or their nest-lings, are destroyed by birds and beasts of prey; we do not al-ways been in mind, that, though food may be now super-abundant, it is not so at all seasons of each recurring year.

 

The flatness at the end is almost deliberate; Darwin’s vision is tragic, but it is not hysterical. It never rises in pitch to melodrama, as in the “Nature, red in tooth and claw” of Tennyson’s “In Memoriam,” or the Grand Guignol vision of some of Darwin’s followers. After millions of years of evolution, Romanes writes typically in 1892:

 

We find that more than half of the species which have survived the ceaseless struggle are parasitic in their habits, lower and insentient forms of life feasting on higher and sentient forms; we find teeth and talons whetted for slaughter, hooks and suckers moulded for torment—everywhere a reign of terror, hunger, and sickness, with oozing blood and quivering limb, with gasping breath and eyes of innocence that dimly close in deaths of brutal torture!

 

Darwin is aware of the tragic ambivalence of life and death, that for use thousand years “pigeons have been watched and tended with the utmost care, and loved by many people,” and for just as long have been as considerately raised and tended for the pot. In the Journal of Researches, Darwin was moved to horror and revulsion by the fact that the natives of Tierra del Fuego, in times of hunger, kill and eat the old women of the tribe sooner than their dogs[12], because “Doggies catch otters, old women no.” By the time of the Origin, this is accepted with calm objectivity:

We see the value set on animals even by the barbarians of Tierra del Fuego, by their killing and devouring their old women, in times of dearth, as of less value than their dogs.

 

II

 

When the Origin appeared, it was reviewed in the American Journal of Science and Arts by Asa Gray, perhaps the shrewdest (as Huxley was the most brilliant) of the Darwinians. Gray noted that Darwin’s frankness about objections and unsolved problems gave the book the character of a mythic quest. He writes: “The interest for the general reader heightens as the author advances on his perilous way and grapples manfully with the most formidable difficulties.” In the Origin, Darwin tends to make the imperilled knight not himself but his theory: a difficulty would be “fatal to the whole theory,” an argument is “a fatal objection,” “Such objections as the above would be fatal to my views,” and so on endlessly. But Darwin’s imagery in correspondence makes it clear that the life at stake is Darwin’s own. Sending an advance copy of the book to Hugh Falconer in 1859, he wrote: “Lord, how savage you will be if you read it, and how you will long to crucify me alive!” He wrote to H. G. Bronn in 186o: “The objections and difficulties which may be urged against my view are indeed heavy enough almost to break my back, but it is not yet broken!” When Lyell refused to come out in support of the theory publicly, Darwin wrote to him: “You cut my throat, and your own throat; and I believe will live to be sorry for it.” In later years Darwin’s correspondence is full of “It is clear to me that I ought to be exterminated,” “I know well that I deserve many a good slap on the face,” “If I am wrong, the sooner I am knocked on the head and annihilated so much the better.” He seems to have seen himself as the scapegoat, the sacrificial victim, sometimes the Judaeo-Christian blameless victim without blemish, but sometimes the guilty pagan slayer who must himself be slain. When the theory of evolution first took publishable form, in 1844, Darwin wrote to Hooker “I am almost convinced (quite contrary to the opinion that I started with) that species are not (it is like confessing a murder) immutable.”

 

If Darwin’s tragic vision embraced bloodshed and murder, it also embraced beauty and joy. The Origin is as full of the word “beauty” as the Journal of Researches, but now it is a utilitarian beauty. Sometimes it is a “beautiful adaptation” to function, like that of the woodpecker, the mistletoe, or the giraffe; sometimes it has a visual loveliness too, as in “the beautifully plumed seed of the dandelion”; sometimes it is an abstraction, like the power engaged “in slowly and beautifully adapting each form to the most complex relations of   life”; sometimes it is pure exultant generalization, “there is so much beauty throughout nature.” The last sentence of the book, beginning “There is grandeur in this view of life,” concludes “from so simple a beginning endless forms most beautiful and most wonderful have been, and are being evolved.” The “wonderful” means, of course, “wonderfully adapted to survive.” In 1863, Darwin wrote to Huxley: “With a book, as with a fine day, one likes it to end with a glorious sunset.”

The Origin, although it resolutely postpones consideration of human origins for a later work, is oddly anthropocentric. One reason is that Darwin constantly humanizes animals in what used to be called the “pathetic fallacy”: male alligators have courtship rites “like Indians in a war dance”; frightened ants “took heart” and a single ant stood “an image of despair over its ravaged home”; in the consolatory statement quoted above, the surviving animals are not only vigorous and healthy, but “happy.” Man is always on Darwin’s mind as he talks of the lower orders. The criteria for an “advance in organization” among the vertebrate are “the degree of intellect and an approach in structure to mats.” When the Origin announces the descent of man, he is not named, simply lumped in: “According to this view it may be inferred that all vertebrate animals with true lungs are descended by ordinary generation from an ancient and unknown prototype, which was furnished with a floating apparatus or swimbladder.” Later in the Origin Darwin concludes in more detail that the higher vertebrates “are the modified descendants of some ancient progenitor, which was furnished in its adult state with branchiae, a swim-bladder, four fin-like limbs, and a long tail, all fitted for an aquatic life.” (More explicitly, Darwin wrote to Lyell in 186o: “Our ancestor was an animal which breathed water, had a swim bladder, a great swimming tail, an imperfect skull, and undoubtedly was an hermaphrodite! Here is a pleasant genealogy for mankind.”).

 

III

 

The chief thematic metaphor in The Origin of Species, constituting the book’s principal imaginative design, is a visual figure that develops in richness and complexity as it goes through a series of metamorphoses. It begins as the ladderlike polity of life, a form of the medieval Great Chain of Being (so exhaustively studied by A. 0. Lovejoy in his book of that title). Early in the book, Darwin writes of “places in the polity” of nature, “places which are either unoccupied or not perfectly occupied by other beings,” “a place in the natural polity of the country,” “new places in the polity of nature.” Eventually this progresses from simple to complex, and becomes a vision of “one long and branching chain of life,” of which we know from the past only a few links (the nonsense of the “Missing Link” apeman seems to be based on this passage). As the book goes on, the figure modifies from the chain, either simple or complex, to that of a living tree, in a remarkable extended metaphor (earlier used in a letter to Gray that was one of the documents presented to the Linnean Society):

 

The affinities of all the beings of the some class have some-times been represented by a great tree. I believe this simile largely speaks the truth. The green and budding twigs may represent existing species; and those produced during former years may represent the long succession of extinct species. At each period of growth all the growing twigs have tried to branch out on all sides, and to overtop and kill the surrounding twigs and branch., in the some manner as species and groups of species have at all times overmastered other species in the great battle for life. The limbs divided into great branch, and these into lesser and lesser branches, were themselves once, when the tree was young, budding twigs, and this connection of the former and present buds by ramifying branches may well represent the classification of all extinct and living species in groups subordinate to groups. Of the many twigs which flourished when the tree was a mere bush, only two or three, now grown into great branches, yet survive and bear the other branches; so with the species which lived during long-past geological periods, very few have left living and modified descendants. From the first growth of the tree, many a limb and branch has decayed and dropped off; and these fallen branches of various sizes may represent those whole orders, families, and genera which have now no living representatives, and which are known to as only in a fossil state. As we here and there see a thin straggling branch springing from a fork low down in a tree, and which by some chance has been favoured and is still alive on its summit, so we occasionally see an animal like the Ornithorhynchus or Lepidosiren, which in some small degree connects by its affinities two large branches of life, and which has apparently been saved from fatal competition by having inhabited a protected station. As buds give rise by growth to fresh buds, and these, if vigorous, branch out and overtop on all sides many a feebler branch, so by generation I believe it has been with the great Tree of Life, which fills with its dead and broken brandies the crust of the earth, and covers the surface with its ever-branching and beautiful ramifications.

 

Darwin continues to use the tree figure, later referring to the variety of species as “like the branching of a great tree from a single stem.” Even this image, however, ultimately will not contain the infinite richness of ecological relationships in nature, which he describes as progressing “onwards in ever-increasing circles of complexity.” The book’s final paragraph achieves the ultimate transformation. It begins:

It is interesting to contemplate a tangled bank, clothed with many plants of many kinds, with birds singing on the bushes, with various insects flitting about, and with worms crawling through the damp earth, and to reflect that these elaborately constructed forms, so different from each other, and dependent upon each other in so complex a manner, have all been produced by laws acting around us.

 

With the image of the tangled bank, so reminiscent of Shakespearean lyric, Darwin embraces all the rich complexity of life. The image of the great Chain of Life is ordered, hierarchic, and static, essentially medieval; the great Tree of Life is ordered, hierarchic, but dynamic and competitive, a Renaissance vision; but the great Tangled Bank of Life is disordered, democratic, and subtly interdependent as well as competitive, essentially a modern vision.

 

The minor metaphors in the work fall into place within this great organizing metaphor. “Struggle for existence” and “survival of the fittest,” noted above, are other ways of looking at the tangled bank. The metaphors are epiphanies or showings forth; for the most part they image process in dramatic action, provide scenes “in an ever slowly changing drama”: “as with mariners shipwrecked near a coast”; “to feel no surprise at sickness, but, when the sick man dies, to wonder and to suspect that he died by some deed of violence”; “when we no longer look at an organic being as a savage looks at a ship.” A constant metaphor is language itself: “a breed, like a dialect of a language”; “It may be worthwhile to illustrate this view of classification, by taking the case of languages”; “Rudimentary organs may be compared with the letters in a word”; and so on. J. Arthur Thomson, in Dar-win and Modern Science, praises Darwin’s “clear visions” and they are all metaphors: “visions of the web of life, of the fountain of change within the organism, of the struggle for existence and of its winnowing, and of the spreading genealogical tree.” Darwin says of morphology, defined in the Origin’s Glossary as “The law of form or structure independent of function”: “This is one of the most interesting departments of natural history, and may almost be said to be its very soul.” Similarly, Aristotle says in the Poetics (in By-water’s translation): “But the greatest thing by far is to be a master of metaphor. It is the one thing that cannot be learnt from others; and it is also a sign of genius, since a good metaphor implies an intuitive perception of the similarity in dissimilars.” By this criterion Darwin displayed genius as morphologist and metaphorist alike.

 

Perhaps the most surprising thing in The Origin of Species, to those who think of Darwin as the type of the prosaic scientist, is that it repeatedly calls not for an act of understanding but for an act of the imagination. Darwin writes: “It is good thus to try in imagination,” “How strange are these facts!” “no one with the most vivid imagination would ever have thought,” “no one can have marvelled more than I have done,” “the fact is a marvelous one,” “But these cases are so wonderful,” “Glancing et instincts, marvellous as some are,” “We see the full meaning of the wonderful fact,” and so on. The call is not only for imagination, marvel, wonder, but for the sort of immersion in nature that led Emerson to say “Books are for the scholars’s idle hours.” Darwin writes:

It is hardly possible for me to recall to the reader who is not a practical geologist, the facts leading the mind to comprehend the lapse of time…. Not that it suffices to study the Principles of Geology, or to read special treatises by different observers on separate formations, and to mark how each author at-tempts to give an inadequate idea of the duration of each formation, or even of each stratum. We can best gain some idea of past time by knowing the agencies at work, and learning how deeply the surface of the land has been denuded, and how much sediment has been deposited…. Therefore a man should examine for himself the great piles of superimposed strata, and watch the rivulets bringing down mud, and the waves wearing away the sea-cliffs, in order to comprehend something about the duration of past time, the monuments of which we see all around us. It is good to wander along the coast, when formed of moderately hard rocks, and mark the process of degradation.

 

Perhaps not to far as it might seem from Proust’s comparable venture in comprehending the duration of past time.



[1] The article entitled Darwin the dramatist, was written by Stanley Edgar Hyman and published in The Centennial Review of Arts & Science in 1959. The annotations contain my commentaries to it. Information about the author is taken from Wikipedia (Newspeak dictionary).

[2] Stanley Edgar Hyman (1919–1970) was a literary critic who wrote primarily about critical methods: the distinct strategies critics use in approaching literary texts.  He was influential for the development of literary theory in the 1940s and 1950s. Equally skeptical of every major critical methodology of his time, he worked out an early instance of a critical theory, exploring ways that critics can be foiled by their own methods. “Each critic,” Hyman wrote in The Armed Vision, “tends to have a master metaphor or series of metaphors in terms of which he sees the critical function. This metaphor then shapes, informs, and sometimes limits his work.” Hyman saw it as his own critical task to point out these overriding themes by which, tacitly, other critics organized their work and their thinking.

Hyman was born in Brooklyn, New York and graduated from Syracuse University in 1940. He was a staff writer for The New Yorker for much of his life, and although he did not possess a graduate degree, taught at Bennington College in Bennington, Vermont. From 1961 to 1965, Hyman was the literary critic of The New Leader.

[3] A rather curious sentence: most of the thinking world was convinced of the evolution of species. It shows:  1) how little evidence is required to convince so many people, 2) How scarcely thinking is the thinking world. Perhaps the non-thinking world may be clever.

[4] Confusion between scientific argument and rhetorical organization. These are here shown as equivalent, but indeed these are quite different things. OSMNS is very weak in the first, but strong in the second.

[5] Please see footnote number 11.

[6] In a strict sense there is not a scientific theory that may be attributed to Darwin.

[7] Establish an idea? Is this a scientific objective?

[8] What are those Darwin’s processes?

[9] Is it possible to confuse processes with hypotheses?

[10] First, Darwin confused selection with breeding (a methonimy). To escape this mistake he uses the expression natural selection (an oxymoron). To escape this he defines it as survival of the fittest (pleonasm). Then he starts constructing several prosopopeyas, attributing actions to these constructions. The rhetorical analysis of chapter IV of OSMNS shows an accumulation of mistakes. Tautology is only a small part of it. Please see the book Está usted de broma Mr Darin? La retórica en el corazón del darwinismo for an explanation (English version in progress).

[11] He may have had the help of others, such as for example Thomas Henry Huxley. Adrian Desmond, the biographer of both, Darwin and Huxley, points to a paragraph in OSMNS as being a product of Huxley. There are very probably some more paragraphs in OSMNS due to Huxley.

[12] This has been repeated in many instances but never confirmed by any anthropology study or even the simplest evidence.

 

Etiquetas:

La felicidad de contemplar cuatro gusanos en el párrafo octingentésimo cuadragésimo y último de El Origen de las Especies

Acaba la obra que hemos leido despacio, párrafo a párrafo, día a día, durante casi cuatro años.

Acaba la obra y lloramos de emoción al leer este último párrafo.

En uno de sus largos paseos, el autor se ha sentado y contempla a la naturaleza. Naturaleza que él mismo va a transformar mediante el imperativo de su mirada. No exageramos por tanto si decimos que el momento descrito en este párrafo es el final de la edad antigua y el comienzo de la nueva. El final de la Historia Natural y el principio de la Biología. El final de un mundo en que la humildad es virtud y el principio de un mundo que exige al ser humano ser arrogante.

El autor, el profeta máximo de la arrogancia y la pseudociencia, se ha sentado y contempla un enmarañado ribazo cubierto por muchas plantas de varias clases. Si fuese un botánico o un naturalista, mencionaría las especies, pero él no distingue especies, clases o variedades. En realidad él solo estudió para clérigo y de esto hace ya mucho, mucho tiempo. Pero el estudio no cayó en saco roto.

Las aves cantan en los matorrales, tampoco importa qué aves sean, ruiseñores, canarios o …buitres. En el mundo moderno, ave es suficiente.

Diferentes insectos revolotean, pero si para las plantas y para las aves no importaba la especie, te diré lo que importa en el caso de los insectos: Nada. Un insecto ya debe conformarse con tener este nombre: Insecto. Más que suficiente.

Los gusanos que se arrastran entre la tierra húmeda nos invitan a reflexionar en todas estas formas, primorosamente construidas, tan diferentes entre sí, y que dependen mutuamente de modos tan complejos.

Todas ellas, gusanos, insectos, aves, plantas y otras incluyendo al propio observador, el autor de este desafortunado libro que nunca debió ser publicado, todas ellas han sido producidas por leyes que obran a nuestro alrededor. Leyes que son, a saber: crecimiento con reproducción; herencia; variación por la acción directa e indirecta de las condiciones de vida y por el uso y desuso.

Pero,…. Un momento: ¿Puede llamarse ley a todo esto? ¿Existe algo que pueda llamarse  Ley del crecimiento con reproducción? Sospecho que no

¿Algo que se pueda llamar Ley de la herencia? Me temo que no.

 

Sí existe, en cambio, algo que puede llamarse ley de la variación por la acción directa e indirecta de las condiciones de vida y por el uso y desuso. Estas son  leyes que estableció Lamarck a quien Darwin ha venido copiando desde el principio hasta el final de su obra.

El resto, ya saben, lo de siempre: Malthus,… Malthus y Dios. Es decir, la selección natural.

 

 

 

..una razón del aumento, tan elevada, tan grande, que conduce a una lucha por la vida, y como consecuencia a la selección natural, que determina la divergencia de caracteres y la extinción de las formas menos perfeccionadas. Así, la cosa más elevada que somos capaces de concebir, o sea la producción de los animales superiores, resulta directamente de la guerra de la naturaleza, del hambre y de la muerte. Hay grandeza en esta concepción de que la vida, con sus diferentes fuerzas, ha sido alentada por el Creador en un corto número de formas o en una sola, y que, mientras este planeta ha ido girando según la constante ley de la gravitación, se han desarrollado y se están desarrollando, a partir de un principio tan sencillo, infinidad de formas las más bellas y portentosas.

 

 

 

 

 

840.

 

It is interesting to contemplate a tangled bank, clothed with many plants of many kinds, with birds singing on the bushes, with various insects flitting about, and with worms crawling through the damp earth, and to reflect that these elaborately constructed forms, so different from each other, and dependent upon each other in so complex a manner, have all been produced by laws acting around us. These laws, taken in the largest sense, being Growth with reproduction; Inheritance which is almost implied by reproduction; Variability from the indirect and direct action of the conditions of life, and from use and disuse; a Ratio of Increase so high as to lead to a Struggle for Life, and as a consequence to Natural Selection, entailing Divergence of Character and the Extinction of less improved forms. Thus, from the war of nature, from famine and death, the most exalted object which we are capable of conceiving, namely, the production of the higher animals, directly follows. There is grandeur in this view of life, with its several powers, having been originally breathed by the Creator into a few forms or into one; and that, whilst this planet has gone circling on according to the fixed law of gravity, from so simple a beginning endless forms most beautiful and most wonderful have been, and are being evolved.

 

Es interesante contemplar un enmarañado ribazo cubierto por muchas plantas de varias clases, con aves que cantan en los matorrales, con diferentes insectos que revolotean y con gusanos que se arrastran entre la tierra húmeda, y reflexionar que estas formas, primorosamente construidas, tan diferentes entre sí, y que dependen mutuamente de modos tan complejos, han sido producidas por leyes que obran a nuestro alrededor. Estas leyes, tomadas en un sentido más amplio, son: la de crecimiento con reproducción; la de herencia, que casi está comprendida en la de reproducción; la de variación por la acción directa e indirecta de las condiciones de vida y por el uso y desuso; una razón del aumento, tan elevada, tan grande, que conduce a una lucha por la vida, y como consecuencia a la selección natural, que determina la divergencia de caracteres y la extinción de las formas menos perfeccionadas. Así, la cosa más elevada que somos capaces de concebir, o sea la producción de los animales superiores, resulta directamente de la guerra de la naturaleza, del hambre y de la muerte. Hay grandeza en esta concepción de que la vida, con sus diferentes fuerzas, ha sido alentada por el Creador en un corto número de formas o en una sola, y que, mientras este planeta ha ido girando según la constante ley de la gravitación, se han desarrollado y se están desarrollando, a partir de un principio tan sencillo, infinidad de formas las más bellas y portentosas.

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Ancho es el campo que veo en el párrafo octingentésimo trigésimo octavo de El Origen de las Especies

Párrafo breve pero profético. Necesariamente ha de ser profético puesto que quien escribe es la voz de la autoridad y si no acertase, bien podría esa misma autoridad hacer cambiar las cosas para que pareciera que había acertado. Por ejemplo donde dice:

Se proyectará mucha luz sobre el origen del hombre y sobre su historia.

 

Si no acertase y el futuro no proyectase luz alguna sobre el origen del hombre, entonces bien podríamos inventar lo que fuese necesario y conveniente a tal fin. Lo dicho: Profético, que las profecías a la fuerza también son profecías.

 

 

838.

 

 In the future I see open fields for far more important researches. Psychology will be securely based on the foundation already well laid by Mr. Herbert Spencer, that of the necessary acquirement of each mental power and capacity by gradation. Much light will be thrown on the origin of man and his history.

 

En el porvenir veo ancho campo para investigaciones mucho más interesantes. La Psicología se basará seguramente sobre los cimientos, bien echados ya por míster Herbert Spencer, de la necesaria adquisición gradual de cada una de las facultades y aptitudes mentales. Se proyectará mucha luz sobre el origen del hombre y sobre su historia.

 

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Categorias: AAA (ver todas las entradas), Antropomorfismo, Binomio Con-Con, Ciencia a debate, Ciencia ficción, Concepto de Especie, confusión, Confusión mental, Conocimiento, contradicción, Creación, Creencia, Crítica, Críticos de Darwin, Curiosidades y anécdotas, Darwinismo, Debates históricos y debates de ficción, Divina Comedia, Divulgación científica, Doblepensar, Dogmas, El destino del hombre en la Naturaleza, Eugenesia, Evolución, Filosofía, Flatus vocis, Fraude, General, Historia de la biologia, Historia Natural, Humanismo, Ideas, idioma darwiniano o darvinés, Infierno, Ingsoc, Institucionalización de la ciencia, La sombra de Darwin, Lenguaje, Máquina incapaz de distinguir, Materialismo, Mitos y Leyendas de la Ciencia, Objetivos de la biología, Pseudociencia, Religión, Revoluciones, Sectarismo, Ser humano, Visión del Mundo

Aumentando el valor de las producciones en el párrafo octingentésimo trigésimo quinto de El Origen de las Especies

Una vez que nos hayamos cargado la taxonomía, que era básicamente lo que se proponía en los párrafos anteriores, entonces… Entonces, en este párrafo podemos ver cuáles serán las consecuencias de tamaño disparate. No sorprende ver entre ellas lo siguiente:

 

El estudio de las producciones domésticas aumentará inmensamente de valor.

 

 

Efectivamente. Con las producciones domésticas empezaba la obra y con las producciones domésticas termina. Objetivo cumplido. Si los ganaderos y los granjeros aumentan el valor de sus producciones entonces el autor puede ir a dormir tranquilo. El resto le importa un bledo.

 

El disparate llega a cotas inauditas, pero proféticas:

 

Una nueva variedad formada por el hombre será un objeto de estudio más importante e interesante que una especie más añadida a la infinidad de especies ya registradas.

 

835.

A grand and almost untrodden field of inquiry will be opened, on the causes and laws of variation, on correlation, on the effects of use and disuse, on the direct action of external conditions, and so forth. The study of domestic productions will rise immensely in value. A new variety raised by man will be a far more important and interesting subject for study than one more species added to the infinitude of already recorded species. Our classifications will come to be, as far as they can be so made, genealogies; and will then truly give what may be called the plan of creation. The rules for classifying will no doubt become simpler when we have a definite object in view. We possess no pedigree or armorial bearings; and we have to discover and trace the many diverging lines of descent in our natural genealogies, by characters of any kind which have long been inherited. Rudimentary organs will speak infallibly with respect to the nature of long-lost structures. Species and groups of species which are called aberrant, and which may fancifully be called living fossils, will aid us in forming a picture of the ancient forms of life. Embryology will often reveal to us the structure, in some degree obscured, of the prototypes of each great class.

 

Se abrirá un campo de investigación, grande y casi no pisado, sobre las causas y leyes de la variación, la correlación, los efectos del uso y del desuso, la acción directa de las condiciones externas, y así sucesivamente. El estudio de las producciones domésticas aumentará inmensamente de valor. Una nueva variedad formada por el hombre será un objeto de estudio más importante e interesante que una especie más añadida a la infinidad de especies ya registradas. Nuestras clasificaciones llegarán a ser genealógicas hasta donde puedan hacerse de este modo, y entonces expresarán verdaderamente lo que puede llamarse el plan de creación. Las reglas de la clasificación, indudablemente, se simplificarán cuando tengamos a la vista un fin definido. No poseemos ni genealogías ni escudos de armas, y hemos de descubrir y seguir las numerosas líneas genealógicas divergentes en nuestras genealogías naturales, mediante los caracteres de todas clases que han sido heredados durante mucho tiempo. Los órganos rudimentarios hablarán infaliblemente sobre la naturaleza de conformaciones perdidas desde hace mucho tiempo; especies y grupos de especies llamadas aberrantes, y que pueden elegantemente llamarse fósiles vivientes, nos ayudarán a formar una representación de las antiguas formas orgánicas. La embriología nos revelará muchas veces la conformación, en algún grado obscurecida, de los prototipos de cada una de las grandes clases.

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Categorias: AAA (ver todas las entradas), Agricultura, Antropomorfismo, Binomio Con-Con, Biología, Ciencia a debate, Ciencia ficción, Clasificación, Concepto de Especie, confusión, Confusión mental, Conocimiento, Creencia, Crítica, Críticos de Darwin, Darwinismo, Divina Comedia, Doblepensar, El destino del hombre en la Naturaleza, Episteme, Eugenesia, Evolución, Filosofía, Fraude, Hipótesis, Historia, Historia de la biologia, Historia Natural, Humanismo, Ideas, idioma darwiniano o darvinés, Infierno, Ingsoc, Institucionalización de la ciencia, La sombra de Darwin, Materialismo, Origen de la biología, Progreso, Pseudociencia, reduccionismo, Religión, Revoluciones, Sectarismo, Selección Natural, Ser humano, Significado de biología, Taxonomía, Último Escolástico, Visión del Mundo, Zoología

Todo el mundo admitirá que los registros geológicos son imperfectos y otra enorme falsedad en el párrafo septingentésimo nonagésimo sexto de El Origen de las Especies

Y ahora, se preguntarán ustedes: ¿Cuál es esa enorme falsedad?. Pues bien. Esta:

 

Si consideramos espacios de tiempo lo bastante largos, la Geología manifiesta claramente que todas las especies han cambiado y que han cambiado del modo exigido por la teoría, pues han cambiado lentamente y de un modo gradual.

 

La Geología no manifiesta en absoluto que las especies hayan cambiado. Y mucho menos que lo hayan hecho de modo gradual.

 

 

796

 

 

That the geological record is imperfect all will admit; but that it is imperfect to the degree required by our theory, few will be inclined to admit. If we look to long enough intervals of time, geology plainly declares that species have all changed; and they have changed in the manner required by the theory, for they have changed slowly and in a graduated manner. We clearly see this in the fossil remains from consecutive formations invariably being much more closely related to each other than are the fossils from widely separated formations.

 

Todo el mundo admitirá que los registros geológicos son imperfectos; muy pocos se inclinarán a admitir que lo son en el grado requerido por nuestra teoría. Si consideramos espacios de tiempo lo bastante largos, la Geología manifiesta claramente que todas las especies han cambiado y que han cambiado del modo exigido por la teoría, pues han cambiado lentamente y de un modo gradual. Vemos esto claramente en que los restos fósiles de formaciones consecutivas están invariablemente mucho más relacionadas entre sí que los de formaciones muy separadas.

 

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Categorias: AAA (ver todas las entradas), Binomio Con-Con, Ciencia ficción, Concepto de Especie, confusión, Confusión mental, Conocimiento, contradicción, Creencia, Crítica, Darwinismo, Debates históricos y debates de ficción, Diseño, Diseño Inteligente (ID), Doblepensar, Dogmas, Episteme, Equilibrio puntuado, Estructuralismo, Evolución, Filosofía, Fraude, Geología, Historia Natural, Ideas, idioma darwiniano o darvinés, Infierno, Ingsoc, Institucionalización de la ciencia, Lenguaje, Máquina incapaz de distinguir, Materialismo, Mitos y Leyendas de la Ciencia, Naturaleza fantástica, On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection, or the Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life, OSMNS, OSMNS Contradicciones, OSMNS Errores, OSMNS Falacias, Paleontología, Pseudociencia, Sectarismo

Engaños de teatro para un infeliz en el párrafo septingentésimo vigésimo noveno de El Origen de las Especies

El lenguaje darwiniano nos sorprende ahora con facetas inesperadas para referirse a la maravilla del mimetismo. Así tenemos:

 

por qué la naturaleza, con gran asombro de los naturalistas, ha consentido en engaños de teatro

 

Pero lo más asombroso es la rotundidad y la decisión con que el autor expone ese momento clave en toda ideología,  el momento de haber llegado a una verdad absoluta:

 

Míster Bates, indudablemente, ha dado con la verdadera explicación. Las formas imitadas, que siempre abundan mucho, tienen que escapar habitualmente en gran medida a la destrucción, pues de otro modo no podrían existir formando tales enjambres, y actualmente se ha recogido un gran cúmulo de pruebas que demuestran que son desagradables a las aves y otros animales insectívoros. Las formas imitadoras que viven en la misma región son, por el contrario, relativamente escasas y pertenecen a grupos raros; por consiguiente, han de sufrir habitualmente alguna causa de destrucción; pues de otra manera, dado el número de huevos que ponen todas las mariposas, al cabo de tres o cuatro generaciones volarían en enjambres por toda la comarca

 

 

Lo que no puede ser, como ocurre tantas veces, es: que tanta certeza esté basada sólo en especulación:

 

Ahora bien, si un individuo de uno de estos grupos raros y perseguidos tomase una vestimenta tan parecida a la de una especie bien protegida, que continuamente engañase la vista experimentada de un entomólogo, engañarla muchas veces a insectos y aves insectívoras, y de este modo se librarla muchas veces de la destrucción. Casi puede decirse que míster Bates ha sido testigo del proceso mediante el cual los imitadores han llegado a parecerse tanto a los imitados, pues encontró que algunas de las formas de Leptalis que imitan a tantas otras mariposas varían en sumo grado.

 

 

Y así, en especulación, se mantiene el darwinismo desde hace ciento cincuenta y seis años. Por la fe en ese cambio gradual.

 

Así tenemos que:

 

Casi puede decirse que míster Bates ha sido testigo del proceso mediante el cual los imitadores han llegado a parecerse tanto a los imitados, pues encontró que algunas de las formas de Leptalis que imitan a tantas otras mariposas varían en sumo grado. En una región se presentaban diferentes variedades, y de éstas, una sola se parecía hasta cierto punto a la Ithomia común de la misma región. En otra región había dos o tres variedades, una de las cuales era mucho más común que las otras, y ésta imitaba mucho a otra forma de Ithomia, Partiendo de hechos de esta naturaleza, míster Bates llega a la conclusión de que los Leptalis primero varían, y cuando ocurre que una variedad se parece en algún grado a cualquier mariposa común que vive en la misma región, esta variedad, por su semejanza con una especie floreciente y poco perseguida, tiene más probabilidades de salvarse de ser destruída por los insectos y aves insectívoros y, por consiguiente, se conserva con más frecuencia «por ser eliminados, generación tras generación, los grados menos perfectos de parecido y quedar sólo los otros para propagar la especie»; de manera que tenemos aquí un excelente ejemplo de selección natural.

 

Pero claro, casi puede decirse no es lo mismo que puede decirse. Si ciertamente, la causa fuese bien conocida, entonces no habría necesidad de invocar para nada a la selección natural. Es de la propia duda de donde bien a alimentarse la fe: Credo quia absurdum.

 

Dicho de otro modo:

Ignorance: having answers. Knowledge: having questions.

 

729.

 

We are next led to enquire what reason can be assigned for certain butterflies and moths so often assuming the dress of another and quite distinct form; why, to the perplexity of naturalists, has nature condescended to the tricks of the stage? Mr. Bates has, no doubt, hit on the true explanation. The mocked forms, which always abound in numbers, must habitually escape destruction to a large extent, otherwise they could not exist in such swarms; and a large amount of evidence has now been collected, showing that they are distasteful to birds and other insect-devouring animals. The mocking forms, on the other hand, that inhabit the same district, are comparatively rare, and belong to rare groups; hence, they must suffer habitually from some danger, for otherwise, from the number of eggs laid by all butterflies, they would in three or four generations swarm over the whole country. Now if a member of one of these persecuted and rare groups were to assume a dress so like that of a well-protected species that it continually deceived the practised eyes of an entomologist, it would often deceive predaceous birds and insects, and thus often escape destruction. Mr. Bates may almost be said to have actually witnessed the process by which the mimickers have come so closely to resemble the mimicked; for he found that some of the forms of Leptalis which mimic so many other butterflies, varied in an extreme degree. In one district several varieties occurred, and of these one alone resembled, to a certain extent, the common Ithomia of the same district. In another district there were two or three varieties, one of which was much commoner than the others, and this closely mocked another form of Ithomia. From facts of this nature, Mr. Bates concludes that the Leptalis first varies; and when a variety happens to resemble in some degree any common butterfly inhabiting the same district, this variety, from its resemblance to a flourishing and little persecuted kind, has a better chance of escaping destruction from predaceous birds and insects, and is consequently oftener preserved; “the less perfect degrees of resemblance being generation after generation eliminated, and only the others left to propagate their kind.” So that here we have an excellent illustration of natural selection.

 

Esto nos lleva en seguida a investigar qué razón puede señalarse para que ciertas mariposas tomen con tanta frecuencia el aspecto de otra forma completamente distinta; por qué la naturaleza, con gran asombro de los naturalistas, ha consentido en engaños de teatro. Míster Bates, indudablemente, ha dado con la verdadera explicación. Las formas imitadas, que siempre abundan mucho, tienen que escapar habitualmente en gran medida a la destrucción, pues de otro modo no podrían existir formando tales enjambres, y actualmente se ha recogido un gran cúmulo de pruebas que demuestran que son desagradables a las aves y otros animales insectívoros. Las formas imitadoras que viven en la misma región son, por el contrario, relativamente escasas y pertenecen a grupos raros; por consiguiente, han de sufrir habitualmente alguna causa de destrucción; pues de otra manera, dado el número de huevos que ponen todas las mariposas, al cabo de tres o cuatro generaciones volarían en enjambres por toda la comarca. Ahora bien, si un individuo de uno de estos grupos raros y perseguidos tomase una vestimenta tan parecida a la de una especie bien protegida, que continuamente engañase la vista experimentada de un entomólogo, engañarla muchas veces a insectos y aves insectívoras, y de este modo se librarla muchas veces de la destrucción. Casi puede decirse que míster Bates ha sido testigo del proceso mediante el cual los imitadores han llegado a parecerse tanto a los imitados, pues encontró que algunas de las formas de Leptalis que imitan a tantas otras mariposas varían en sumo grado. En una región se presentaban diferentes variedades, y de éstas, una sola se parecía hasta cierto punto a la Ithomia común de la misma región. En otra región había dos o tres variedades, una de las cuales era mucho más común que las otras, y ésta imitaba mucho a otra forma de Ithomia, Partiendo de hechos de esta naturaleza, míster Bates llega a la conclusión de que los Leptalis primero varían, y cuando ocurre que una variedad se parece en algún grado a cualquier mariposa común que vive en la misma región, esta variedad, por su semejanza con una especie floreciente y poco perseguida, tiene más probabilidades de salvarse de ser destruída por los insectos y aves insectívoros y, por consiguiente, se conserva con más frecuencia «por ser eliminados, generación tras generación, los grados menos perfectos de parecido y quedar sólo los otros para propagar la especie»; de manera que tenemos aquí un excelente ejemplo de selección natural.

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Carta dedicada al Dr Francisco Bravo

A la atención del Dr Francisco Bravo

México D.F.

Estimado Dr Bravo,

Le dedico este artículo que viene a demostrar lo mismo que usted ya había demostrado en sus experimentos, es decir,  que no existe la barrera somatico-germinal, inventada por Arthur Weisman y que ha sido otro gran fraude del darwinismo en la historia de la Ciencia.

Reciba usted un cordial saludo con mi amistad y agradecimiento.

Hasta pronto,

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Tampoco en el párrafo sexcentésimo nonagésimo séptimo del Origen de las Especies es insuperable la dificultad

Igual que en el párrafo anterior, el autor encuentra que la dificultad no es insuperable. Ahora se refiere a que las distintas especies que pertenecen a un mismo género se han propagado partiendo de un origen común. Es bien posible. Tambien es posible que no se hayan propagado partiendo de un origen común. Todo es posible cuando tratamos de un ejemplo de anti-ciencia en el cual hace ya mucho tiempo que no sabemos de qué estamos hablando.

 

697

With respect to distinct species belonging to the same genus, which on our theory have spread from one parent-source; if we make the same allowances as before for our ignorance, and remember that some forms of life have changed very slowly, enormous periods of time having been thus granted for their migration, the difficulties are far from insuperable; though in this case, as in that of the individuals of the same species, they are often great.

 

Por lo que se refiere a las distintas especies que pertenecen a un mismo género, las cuales, según nuestra teoría, se han propagado partiendo de un origen común; si tenemos en cuenta, como antes, nuestra ignorancia y recordamos que algunas formas orgánicas han cambiado muy lentamente, por lo que es necesario conceder períodos enormes de tiempo para sus emigraciones, las dificultades distan mucho de ser insuperables; aunque en este caso, como en los individuos de la misma especie, sean con frecuencia grandes.

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Charles Darwin en El Club de los Suicidas, de Stevenson

 

 

Nos encontramos inmersos en  el primer capítulo. El príncipe Florizel de Bohemia y el coronel Geraldine se encuentran en el Club de los suicidas. Cada uno de los personajes explica sus motivaciones para encontrarse en el mismo:

 

¡A la eterna memoria del baron Trenck, ejemplo de suicidas! -gritó uno-. Pasó de una celda pequeña a otra más pequeña, para poder alcanzar al fin la libertad.

-Por mi parte -dijo un segundo-, sólo deseo una venda para los ojos y algodón para los oídos. Sólo que no hay algodón lo bastante grueso en este mundo.

Un tercero quería averiguar los misterios de la vida futura y un cuarto aseguraba que nunca se hubiera unido al club si no le hubieran inducido a creer en Darwin.

No puedo tolerar la idea de descender de un mono -afirmaba aquel curioso suicida.

Sí. Hemos leído bien. A un miembro del club le habían inducido a creer en Darwin. No es que él se hubiese convencido naturalmente o como fruto de sus propias lecturas independientes. Al parecer había sido el resultado de un lavado de cerebro: Lo indujeron. Seguro que no fue el único. Algo habría oído Stevenson para ponerlo tan claro…………

 

 

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Fantasmas semánticos: Muerto el DNA basura, viva la selección natural

 

Un artículo de Javier Sampedro en El País se hace eco de publicaciones en Nature y otras revistas en las que se exponen los resultados del Proyecto Encode (Encyclopedia of DNA elements).

Tanto la reseña de El País como los artículos que la fundamentan nos sirven para extraer dos conclusiones inmediatamente, una buena y una menos buena:  la buena es que los científicos han dejado de hablar de DNA basura, lo cual era una construcción inventada, fantasma semántico o flatus vocis.  La menos buena es que los científicos no parecen por ahora dispuestos a reconocer que siguen usando otros fantasmas semánticos en su lenguaje habitual entre los que destaca y ocupa lugar predominante la Selección Natural.

 

Dos titulares como siempre llamativos dan comienzo a la noticia de El Pais:

 

Un macroestudio internacional descubre que un 95% de la información genética tiene utilidad, y no solo el 1,5% que se pensaba

La mayoría de la información interviene en funciones biológicas del ser humano

 

Se refiere el primero a lo que sería el principal resultado del trabajo indicado líneas después:

 

El principal resultado de esta especie de Proyecto Genoma II es que lo que se consideraba basura no era tal.

 

Lo que se consideraba basura ya no es basura. Estupendo! Empero esta conclusión nos lleva a  hacer algunas reflexiones.

Veamos:

1.  ¿Quién o quiénes habían considerado basura a lo que no es basura?

 

2.  ¿Por qué? Es decir: ¿Es tal consideración errónea una actitud puntual o por el contrario es más bien reflejo de una actitud general frente a la naturaleza y el entorno?

 

3. En el caso de que la consideración errónea hubiese sido el fruto de una actitud general,.. entonces…¿ cabría pensar que tal actitud tiene que ver con la exaltación de la lucha y la competición, con la llamada Selección Natural que haría ver a algunos equívocadamente a una parte de la naturaleza como apta y a otra como no-apta, inútil o basura?

 

 4. Si así fuese ¿Cuánto tiempo tardarán quienes ahora dicen que no hay DNA basura en reconocer que así como en la Naturaleza no hay basura alguna tampoco hay la selección que indican ahora en sus artículos?

 

 

 

 

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