Archivo de mayo, 2015

New heat transfer fluids: Increasing performance in solar thermal power plants

Autor: José González-Aguilar-IMDEA Energía

Current commercial concentrating solar power (CSP) plants are still largely based on mineral oil parabolic trough technology, developed nearly 30 years ago, and molten-salt and direct steam generation towers [1]. At the same time, Fresnel technology has not fully developed its complete potential achieving a limited deployment and Stirling dish technology has not reached the required degree of development and cost-reduction in order to be competitive with respect to the other STE technologies. Parabolic trough power plants employ Rankine-cycle power blocks with low temperature (< 400ºC) steam turbines which operate with relatively low efficiencies (~35% when dry-cooled [2]), whilst central receiver CSP plants achieve higher temperatures, which have cycle efficiencies in region of 40%, leading to reduced costs. Despite this, both technologies have their associated drawbacks.

 

Molten-salt systems are limited to operating temperatures below 565 °C by the thermal stability of the salt itself, preventing the use of even more efficient, higher temperature power conversion cycles. Molten-salt systems also suffer from freezing problems if the salt temperature drops too low, resulting in high parasitic power consumption for heat-tracing. Direct steam systems are not limited in the temperatures they can achieve, as no intermediary heat transfer fluid is used. However, they typically operate with steam temperatures in the region of 535 °C and no cost-effective large-scale storage system has been developed for live steam. Use of this technology therefore negates the key advantages of solar thermal power: the ability to store energy [1]. As such, if the true potential of CSP technology is to be unlocked, new advances on heat transfer media (HTM) are needed that can both reach higher temperatures and easily be stored. Reaching higher temperatures is seen as key to future cost reductions, as higher temperatures lead to both higher power conversion efficiencies and increased storage densities, directly reducing the total cost of the solar collector field and the specific cost of the storage units. Recent reports points out that improvement in heat transfer fluids (HTFs) and storage solutions result in an expected LCOE reduction varying from 2.3% for Central Receiver to 5.6% for Parabolic Troughs CSP plants [3].

 

A wide range of alternative high-temperature HTM are being studied for use in CSP plants, including improved molten salts, liquid metals, gases, and solid particles [4]. In principle, the simplest solution would appear to be to develop new molten salt materials that are capable of resisting higher temperatures and/or have lower melting temperatures; in this way existing receiver technology could be used, reducing the required investment. However, in order to overcome the temperature limitations imposed by the nitrate salts currently used in CSP plants [5] it is necessary to switch to ternary, quaternary or even quinary mixtures based on nitrate, carbonates and chloride salts, which suffer from corrosion issues at high temperatures, significantly increasing maintenance costs [6]. Liquid metals, mainly based on sodium and lead and their alloys (NaK, lead-bismuth eutectic) are also being explored as HTF due to their high thermal conductivity and low viscosity. However, these fluids have important safety hazards. Alkali metals react with both air and water, thus leading to the risk for accidental fires. Lead-containing liquid metals require specific measures in order to avoid their toxicity by ingestion (proper ventilation, isolation and hygiene facilities). In addition, liquid metals have higher costs that molten salts currently used in CSP plants and they have lower heat capacities, which conduct to lower performance than molten salts as storage media [7].

 

Inert gases (e.g. air, helium, sCO2, etc.) are other alternative as HTF, eliminating the thermal decomposition and corrosion problems and even use them directly as working fluid in appropriate turbines or thermal engines. Thus intermediate heat exchangers are avoided increasing the energy available for electricity production. The use of air as the working fluid in solar tower power plants has been demonstrated since the early 1980s. Main advantages of using air are its availability from the ambient, environmentally-friendly characteristics, no troublesome phase change, higher working temperatures, easy operation and maintenance and high dispatchability. It is a suitable heat transfer fluid in desert areas, where water availability is scare. However its low heat transfer poses challenges for receiver design, while their low densities complicate the integration of energy storage [8]. Supercritical CO2 has recently attracted the solar community attention as HTF since it can operate at very high temperatures, provides suitable thermophysical properties related to the supercritical state and can be directly used as working fluid in sCO2 turbines [9].

 

The use of solid particles as the HTM is another option, capable of reaching temperatures of 1000 °C when ceramic particles are used [10]. Solid particle HTM are also ideally suited for storage applications, which can be easily implemented through simple bulk storage of hot particles. The solid particles are typically directly irradiated by the concentrated sunlight, allowing for very high heat fluxes as there is no interposing material to limit heat transfer. However, this approach leads to high heat losses (thermal efficiencies < 50% under real conditions [11]) and significant difficulties in controlling the flow of loose particles within the receiver. Within this approach, the dense particle suspension (DPS) is an alternative to the classical solid particle HTM, combining the good heat transfer properties of liquids and the ease of handling of gases with the high temperature properties of solid particles. The DPS consists of very small (μm-scale) particles which can be fluidized at low gas velocities and then be easily transported in a similar manner to a gas [12].

 

Inert gases (Air and sCO2) and solid particles (including DPS), which have the highest potential to operate at very high-temperatures between the aforementioned HTFs, are currently investigated in the High Temperature Processes Unit in the framework of national and international research projects (CM Alccones, PN SOlarO2, FP7 CSP2 and IRP STAGE-STE). The research focuses on the development of innovative solar receivers and reactors capable to handle these heat transfer fluids including testing at 15 kWth scale using high-flux solar simulators as well as the design of plant layouts in order to analyze the integration of these HTF (including specific components) and its impact on the CSP plant performances.

 

 

 

Figure 1. Scheme of a CSP plant using dense particles suspension as Heat Transfer Fluid [12]

 

[1] M. Romero, J. González-Aguilar, Solar Thermal CSP Technology, WIREs Energy and Environment, Volume 3 (2014), pp. 42 – 59.

[2] A. Fernández-García, E. Zarza, L. Valenzuela et al., Parabolic-Trough Solar Collectors and their Applications, Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Volume 14/7 (2010), pp. 1695 – 721.

[3] Future renewable energy costs: solar-thermal electricity, Eduardo Zarza, Emilien Simonot, Antoni Martínez, Thomas Winkler (Eds.) KIC InnoEnergy, 2015.

[4] C. Ho, B. Iverson, Review of High-Temperature Central Receiver Designs for Concentrating Solar Power, Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Volume 29 (2014), pp. 835–46.

[5] E. Freeman, The Kinetics of the Thermal Decomposition of Sodium Nitrate and of the Reaction between Sodium Nitrate and Oxygen, Journal of Physical Chemistry, Volume 60 (1956), pp. 1487–93.

[6] A. Kruizenga, 2012, Corrosion Mechanisms in Chloride and Carbonate Salts, Sandia National Laboratories (SAND2012-7594).

[7] J. Pacio, C. Singer, T. Wetzel, R. Uhlig, Thermodynamic evaluation of liquid metals as heat transfer fluids in concentrated solar power plants. Appl. Therm. Eng., Volume 60 (2013), pp. 295–302.

[8] M. Romero and E. Zarza. Concentrating solar thermal power. In: Kreith F., and Goswami Y., eds. Handbook of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. Chapter 21. Boca Raton, Florida: CRC Press, Taylor & Francis Group; 2007, pp. 1–98.

[9] Z. Ma, C. S. Turchi, Advanced supercritical carbon dioxide power cycle configurations for use in concentrating solar power systems, Golden, CO, USA; 2011 [NREL/CP-5500-50787].

[10] P. Falcone, J. Noring, J. Hruby, 1985, Assessment of a Solid Particle receiver for a High Temperature Solar Central Receiver System, SANDIA National Laboratories (SAND85-8208).

[11] P. Siegel, C. No, S. Khalsa et al., Development and Evaluation of a Prototype Solid Particle Solar Receiver: On-Sun Testing and Model Validation, Transactions of the ASME, Journal of Solar Energy Engineering, Volume 132 (2010).

[12] J. Spelling, A. Gallo, M. Romero, J. Gonzalez-Aguilar, A High-Efficiency Solar Thermal Power Plant using a Dense Particle Suspension as the Heat Transfer Fluid, Proceedings of the SolarPACES 2014 Conference, Beijing, China, September 16-19, 2014.

Etiquetas:
Categorias: General

La cooperativa Som Energia supera los 22.000 contratos de luz en cuatro años

La compañía comprará energía limpia a sus nuevas centrales, y el abaratamiento conseguido se traducirá en ahorros en el recibo para los socios

[Autor: Eloy Sanz-Universidad Rey Juan Carlos]

La compañía eléctrica Som Energia, la primera cooperativa española de producción y consumo de electricidad verde, ha alcanzado los 22.888 contratos de luz para dar servicio a otros tantos hogares. Y eso cuando se cumplen cuatro años de su puesta en funcionamiento.

Ahora, además, explora la puesta en marcha de una nueva iniciativa (el proyecto Generation KWH) mediante el cual comprará electricidad a las centrales de producción de energía renovable que ella misma va a promover. “En lugar de ir al mercado a comprar la electricidad, la adquiriremos en nuestras instalaciones, con lo que obtendremos electricidad al precio de coste. La diferencia de costes será un ahorro que nuestros socios notarán en el recibo de la luz”, dice Josep Puig, vicepresidente de Som Energia.

La cooperativa Som Energia nació para promover exclusivamente proyectos de electricidad limpia (con financiación de los socios) con objeto de venderla al mercado. Pero, a la vez, es una compañía comercializadora convencional, que da los servicios propios de una empresa eléctrica que compra la energía al sistema eléctrico y lo entrega a sus clientes (en este caso socios repartidos por Catalunya, Comunidad de Valencia, Baleares y Madrid, entre otros lugares).

En los tres últimos tres años ha pasado de 3.000 socios a 18.668 socios (algunos tienen más de un contrato). La previsión es que este año facture 15 millones de euros.

Importante éxito, e inversiones

El objetivo inicial (y vigente) de sus promotores al nacer era conseguir producir en sus instalaciones la misma cantidad de energía que la que consumen sus socios. Pero esto no ha sido posible, porque el aumento de cooperativistas ha sido superior al ritmo de producción de electricidad verde. Ahora produce el equivalente a 5% del consumo de sus socios.

Som Energia ha impulsado y construido ocho plantas solares fotovoltaicas, entre ellas en Riudarenes, Manlleu, Lleida o Picanya (Valencia), y, además, ha efectuado una inversión en una planta de biogás en Torregrossa, en la que se produce también electricidad a partir del biogás de las deyecciones ganaderas. Todos estos proyectos fueron impulsados con dinero de sus socios con el ánimo de promover las energías renovables. La electricidad se vende a la red, y permite cierta rentabilidad a sus inversores.

Los proyectos, no obstante, se han visto condicionados por el recorte de la retribución (primas) establecida por el Gobierno para la producción de fuente renovables, aunque ha resistido el “seísmo” de la reforma eléctrica.

“En el caso de las plantas fotovoltaicas, hemos podido resistir el recorte, puesto que nosotros no acudimos a los bancos ni contrajimos deudas, sino que nos financiamos con dinero de los socios”, dice Josep Puig.

Más implicación

El nuevo plan de la compañía persigue ampliar la implicación de los socios en la generación de fuentes renovables, mediante una nueva forma de motivación. Por eso, el proyecto (Generation kWh) busca doblegar los contratiempos y obstáculos existentes que frenan el desarrollo de las renovables.

Con este fin, se va a promover un conjunto de nuevas instalaciones de energía renovable (molinos de viento, centrales fotovoltaicas y posiblemente minihidráulica) con participación en forma de inversión voluntaria de los socios. El abaratamiento del coste energético derivado de esta fórmula repercutiría en un ahorro en la factura de la luz de los socios, indica Puig, quien ve abierta la puerta a la introducción de este tipo de contratos de compra venta directa de electricidad tras las reformas del sistema eléctrico.

Los socios pueden destinar entre 100 y 2000 euros y durante 25 años recibirán una cantidad de energía según la aportación realizada. Esa ayuda se traduce en un descenso de la factura eléctrica.

Compromiso “ético”

La cooperativa nació del compromiso y la inquietud de sectores sociales que, “por razones éticas y de sostenibilidad”, desean consumir electricidad “pero evitando el uso del carbón y la quema de gas” para evitar el calentamiento y prevenir la generación de residuos en las nucleares. Los precios que se dan al socio son similares a los de las compañías tradicionales. “El término de potencia es más barato, y el del consumo de energía no está entre los más caros”, resume Puig, que destaca otras ventajas para el socio. Una de ellas es que la cooperativa –añade- permite un modelo de participación democrático en el que los usuarios toman las decisiones.

El esquema tradicional de funcionamiento español para fomentar las renovables se ha basado en centrales (fotovoltaicas, eólicas…) que generan electricidad para ser vendida a la red (para su distribución): pero Som Energia ha contraído el compromiso de que los kilovatios hora consumidos por sus socios serán verdes de forma más directa.

La idea de constituir Som Energia surgió de Gijsbert Huijink, un holandés afincado en Catalunya (profesor en aquel momento de la Universitat de Girona) que quería invertir en alguna cooperativa de energías renovables como las que conocía en su país. Empezó a preguntar e indagar, y vio que no había ninguna iniciativa similar en España. Ahora, otras empresas han aparecido en el mercado con metas similares.

Leer más: http://www.lavanguardia.com/natural/20150310/54428031328/som-energia-electricidad-contratos-luz.html#ixzz3anGi4uWt

Etiquetas:

Hacia la modelización energética de la Comunidad de Madrid: el modelo LEAP-Madrid

[Autores: Diego Iribarren y Mario Martín-Instituto IMDEA Energía]

En las últimas décadas, el cambio climático se ha posicionado como una de las principales amenazas en el camino hacia la sostenibilidad. A pesar de que el Protocolo de Kioto entró en vigor en febrero de 2005, desde una perspectiva global su efectividad ambiental es limitada debido a la falta de participación de ciertos países y ciudades clave. Por lo tanto, son necesarias nuevas políticas que hagan frente de manera exitosa al incremento en las emisiones de gases de efecto invernadero. En este sentido, la consideración de modelos energéticos que engloben vías alternativas y una planificación energética a largo plazo es cada vez más importante para equilibrar adecuadamente las necesidades energéticas de una región con aspectos económicos, sociales y ambientales. El modelo “LEAP-Madrid” se ha desarrollado en la Unidad de Análisis de Sistemas del Instituto IMDEA Energía. Este modelo representa el sistema energético completo de la Comunidad de Madrid y constituye una herramienta de análisis de escenarios para explorar oportunidades actuales y retos futuros. Dada la disponibilidad de datos relevantes, el año base del modelo es 2010. El software “Long-range Energy Alternatives Planning system” (LEAP), ampliamente utilizado para el análisis de políticas energéticas y medidas de mitigación del cambio climático, fue el elegido para el desarrollo de este modelo energético.

La motivación para llevar a cabo LEAP-Madrid es la falta de un modelo actual del sistema energético en esta comunidad. El modelo energético desarrollado puede ser de aplicación tanto a nivel de gobierno, como a nivel de empresas, transporte, etc. LEAP-Madrid abarca toda la Comunidad de Madrid, incluyendo tanto el centro urbano como el resto de la región, lo que constituye una escala adecuada para el desarrollo de políticas. Así, LEAP-Madrid se crea como un marco de contabilidad donde se detalla tanto la oferta como la demanda, incluyendo los siguientes sectores: industria, servicios, agricultura, transporte, residencial y otros. En particular, este modelo incluye una representación muy detallada de los sectores “transporte” y “residencial”, dada su elevada demanda energética.

Se ha utilizado una gran variedad de fuentes de datos locales, nacionales e internacionales para la elaboración del escenario base. Además, los datos implementados para las suposiciones del escenario base incluyen un amplio número de indicadores tales como ingresos, PIB y población, que pueden ser modificados en función del escenario evaluado. En este sentido, el escenario base de LEAP-Madrid se considera el punto de partida para la construcción de escenarios que dibujen la evolución del sistema energético de Madrid en un determinado entorno socio-económico y bajo un conjunto particular de condiciones políticas. Así, se podrán evaluar posibles ahorros derivados de medidas políticas (p. ej., políticas orientadas a aumentar la proporción de energías renovables en el sistema energético madrileño), medidas tecnológicas (p. ej., mejoras en la eficiencia de vehículos eléctricos y de pila de combustible) y cambios sociales (p. ej., aumento en el nivel de conciencia pública sobre prácticas de eficiencia energética). LEAP-Madrid permite esta evaluación con el fin de explorar las vías energéticas más adecuadas dentro del contexto planteado. 

Etiquetas:

Membranas de intercambio con aplicaciones energéticas

[Autores: M. Montiel, P. Ocón. Universidad Autónoma de Madrid]

Una membrana semipermeable (o membrana de intercambio) es una lámina delgada que permite que ciertas moléculas o iones pasen a través de ella por difusión. Este paso de sustancias depende de factores inherentes a la membrana, como la afinidad química por los solutos; a los propios solutos, como el tamaño, o su solubilidad; o de otros factores relacionados con el entorno, como la presión osmótica, la concentración, el gradiente electroquímico o la temperatura en cualquiera de los lados de la membrana [1]. En la naturaleza podemos encontrar ejemplos de membranas semipermeables en las bicapas lipídicas que forman parte de la membrana celular o que envuelven el núcleo de las células. Y, de forma artificial pero inspirados en estas bicapas lipídicas, podemos hablar de los liposomas empleados para el suministro de determinados medicamentos [2]. Además, existen otros tipos de membranas de intercambio que han sido profundamente estudiadas y empleadas industrialmente, en campos tan diversos como la ósmosis inversa, la nano-, ultra- y microfiltración, la pervaporación o la electrodiálisis [3].

Una clasificación de las membranas de intercambio se puede hacer atendiendo a la naturaleza del material del que están hechas:

  • Membranas biológicas: aquellas barreras permeables selectivas que están presentes en seres vivos.
  • Membranas sintéticas: las creadas sintéticamente, que pueden clasificarse en:
    • Membranas líquidas
    • Membranas poliméricas
    • Membranas cerámicas

Pese a la proliferación de procesos de intercambio a través de estos materiales, la Ciencia y Tecnología de Membranas puede considerarse que aún está dando sus primeros pasos. Thomas Graham es considerado uno de los padres de la Ciencia de Membranas, ya que realizó los primeros experimentos de transporte de gases a través de membranas en 1829, al observar cómo una vejiga de cerdo húmeda se hinchaba hasta casi el punto de explosión al ser expuesta a una atmósfera de CO2. En 1861, Graham informó de los primeros experimentos de diálisis usando una membrana sintética. A lo largo del siglo XIX, varios científicos se interesaron por la permeabilidad de los materiales, como Mitchell, que estudió el paso de gases a través de caucho, o Fick, y sus estudios sobre difusión a través de nitrato de celulosa [4].

Pero la Ciencia de Membranas entró en auge en las décadas de 1960 y 1970,  de forma paralela al desarrollo de gran número de polímeros sintéticos y de sus métodos de obtención. Fue en estos años cuando se produjo el desarrollo de procesos de desalinización de agua de mar para el consumo humano, por lo que puede considerarse un área relativamente nueva en química aplicada e ingeniería química. Durante las dos últimas décadas se han desarrollado membranas con multitud de aplicaciones en la separación química: relacionadas con el tratamiento industrial de gases y líquidos (como el tratamiento de aguas residuales, control de contaminantes o recuperación de residuos); con el procesado de alimentos, la biotecnología o la biomedicina; con la industria petrolífera…

En la actualidad también están jugando un papel especial en el campo de las energías alternativas, con aplicaciones en:

  • captura de CO2
  • producción de hidrógeno
  • producción y purificación de biocombustibles
  • conversión electroquímica
    • pilas de combustible
    • electrolizadores
    • baterías

En este sentido, el Grupo de Investigación en Electroquímica de la UAM está trabajando en la actualidad en el desarrollo de membranas de intercambio de iones para uso en pilas de combustible de membrana polimérica (PEMFC).

Tradicionalmente, este tipo de dispositivos ha utilizado como electrolito sólido membranas de intercambio catiónico, que permiten el movimiento de protones entre los electrodos y, a su vez, impiden el paso de electrones. Además, son relativamente impermeables al aire (que alimenta el cátodo) o a los combustibles empleados, como hidrógeno o alcoholes (que alimentan el ánodo). Otros requisitos que deben cumplir este tipo de membranas son la estabilidad química y electroquímica en las condiciones de trabajo del dispositivo, propiedades mecánicas y químicas adecuadas para formar el denominado conjunto membrana-electrodos (MEA) y costes de producción compatibles con la aplicación.

Dentro de las membranas de intercambio catiónico, las que más éxito comercial han tenido son las basadas en Nafion®, un polímero desarrollado por DuPont formado por un esqueleto perfluorado que presenta ramificaciones con grupos sulfónicos. Estos grupos permiten la movilidad de cationes a través de la membrana. Existen otro tipo de membranas basadas en polímeros parcialmente fluorados, como las de trifluoroestireno de Ballard Advanced Materials, o las basadas en grupos arilsulfónicos, como las de poliéter éter cetona sulfonadas (SPEEK) [5].

Por otro lado, tal y como se comentó en una entrada anterior de este blog [6], las pilas de combustible alcalinas (AFC) tienen muchas ventajas respecto a las de medio ácido, y la tendencia actual se basa en el desarrollo de membranas de intercambio aniónico (AEM). Este tipo de materiales permite aunar las ventajas de trabajar en medio básico (cinéticas más rápidas, ambiente menos corrosivo) con las derivadas del uso de electrolitos sólidos (ausencia de pérdidas de electrolito, fácil manipulación). Las membranas de intercambio aniónico empleadas en la actualidad constan generalmente de un esqueleto carbonado que presenta sustituyentes catiónicos de tipo amonio cuaternario, imidazolio, guanidinio, fosfonio, sulfonio… que permiten el intercambio de aniones a través de la membrana.

En las próximas entregas de este blog se comentarán con más detalle las tendencias actuales y las características tanto de las membranas de intercambio catiónico como de las de tipo aniónico.

[1]   Wikipedia (21/05/2015). “Semipermeable membranes”         from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Semipermeable_membrane.

[2]   Wikipedia (21/05/2015). “Lipid bilayer”        from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lipid_bilayer.

[3]   Inamuddin and Luqman, M. (2012). Ion Exchange Technology I. Theory and Materials, Springer.

[4]   Khulbe, K. C., Feng, C. Y. and Matsuura, T. (2008). Synthetic Polymeric Membranes, Springer.

[5]   Zaidi, S. M. J. and Matsuura, T. (2008). Polymer Membranes for Fuel Cells, Springer.

[6]   Hernández-Fernández, P. and Ocón, P. (21/05/2015). “Pilas de combustible de membrana de intercambio aniónico”         from http://www.madrimasd.org/blogs/energiasalternativas/2010/05/26/130881.

Etiquetas:

CURSO “Nuevas tendencias y retos de los procesos químicos en el siglo XXI“

Del 22 al 24 de Abril se celebró la segunda edición del Curso “Nuevas tendencias y retos de los Procesos Químicos en el siglo XXI“, organizado por la UNED, en su Centro Asociado de las Escuelas Pías de Madrid, con una participación de asistentes cercana a los 70, algunos de fuera de Madrid.

[Autor: Pedro Ávila-CSIC]

Se trata de un curso dirigido a estudiantes, tanto de grado como de postgrado, que ha estado enfocado a mostrar los últimos avances en sistemas catalíticos y su uso en diferentes aplicaciones energéticas y medioambientales. Las organizadoras del curso señalaban en su página web (http://extension.uned.es/actividad/idactividad/9057): “Es evidente que vivimos en una sociedad altamente consumidora de recursos energéticos y materiales. La clave para un desarrollo sostenible está en encontrar nuevos procesos que nos permitan mantener el mismo nivel de vida pero con procesos de producción de energía y materiales más respetuosos con el medioambiente y viables con los recursos disponibles. En el presente curso se pretende hacer un análisis del estado actual del conocimiento científico respecto a los procesos químicos más usuales, y se expondrán cuáles serán las tendencias y avances en las próximas décadas. Su objetivo principal es dar una visión general al estudiante de cómo el desarrollo de nuevos procesos y mejora de los existentes tiene un gran impacto directo sobre la sociedad y, por la tanto, la economía de un país”.

Esta segunda edición resultó como consecuencia de la excelente acogida y experiencia de la primera edición celebrada en Málaga en abril de 2014, que contó con la presencia como ponente del Prof.  Avelino CORMA, Premio Príncipe de Asturias de Investigación Científica y Técnicas 2014. Para esta edición se ha modificado ligeramente el programa incorporando ponentes del sector privado, como la Dra. Juana M. FRONTELA, del centro de investigación de CEPSA en Madrid; y la charla de clausura estuvo a cargo del Catedrático de Ingeniería Química, Prof. Juan J. Rodríguez.

El curso ha sido organizado por la UNED, siendo dirigido por María Elena Pérez Mayoral, Profesora Titular de Química Inorgánica de la UNED y María Olga Guerrero, Profesora Titular de Ingeniería Química de la Universidad de Málaga y coordinado por Rosa María Martín Aranda, Catedrática de Química Inorgánica de la UNED. El curso contó con la participación de 15 ponentes de universidades españolas y del CSIC, del Instituto de Catálisis y Petroleoquímica mayoritariamente.  

Sin lugar a dudas, este evento ha sido muy satisfactorio para profesores y alumnos, puesto que se ha hecho un riguroso análisis del estado del arte y se ha hecho un concienzudo análisis sobre los avances que veremos en las próximas décadas en el campo de los procesos químicos. Por ello, se hará lo posible por organizar la tercera edición de este curso en el 2016 y de esta manera consolidar este evento.

Etiquetas:

El proyecto SKA: ¿una oportunidad para las Energías Renovables?

[Autor: Jesús Fernández-Reche. CIEMAT-Plataforma Solar de Almería]

El proyecto SKA, iniciales de Square Kilometer Array, es un gran esfuerzo internacional cuyo objetivo es la construcción del mayor radiotelescopio del mundo, formado por una superficie colectora total de 1 km2 (106 m²). Pero toda esta superficie no estará integrada en un único objeto, sino que estará formado por miles de radiotelescopios parabólicos, y hasta un millón de antenas de baja frecuencia. El radiotelescopio resultante permitirá a los astrónomos realizar observaciones profundas y de gran detalle del cielo (con una calidad de imagen superior en varios órdenes de magnitud al telescopio Hubble). Al mismo tiempo tendrá la capacidad de rastrear grandes áreas de cielo con un nivel de sensibilidad jamas alcanzado por un telescopio.

 

Antenas parabólicas (izquierda) y antenas de baja frecuencia (derecha) del proyecto SKA.

Cortesía:  Consorcio SKA

Este proyecto supone un gran reto tecnológico y científico ya que, los miles de parábolas y millones de antenas con las que contará el proyecto se instalaran de manera distribuida entre Sudáfrica y Australia. Y esto supone que todo el equipamiento deberá estar interconectado y sincronizado para el buen funcionamiento del sistema y el tratamiento posterior de la información. Algunos datos de la magnitud del proyecto:

  • Los datos obtenidos en un día por SKA tardarían 2 millones de años en ser reproducidos en un iPod.
  • El sistema central de tratamiento de datos de SKA tendrá una capacidad de procesamiento similar a 100 millones de PCs.
  • Las radioantenas parabólicas de SKA producirán un volumen de datos similar a 10 veces el tráfico mundial actual de internet.
  • Se empleará una cantidad de fibra óptica como para rodear dos veces el planeta Tierra.


El suministro de energía a todos los procesos, desde los pocos vatios de consumo de una antena de baja frecuencia, hasta los Megavatios que consumirá el centro de computación, supone otro de los retos tecnológicos, necesitando electrificar, tanto nucleos centrales del proyecto, como elementos distribuidos en localizaciones remotas. Y es aquí donde entran en juego las energías renovables en su conjunto, ya que existe un compromiso por parte de la organización de SKA de “no caer en la contradicción de contaminar la Tierra para comprender el Universo. Es por ello que este proyecto nos ofrecerá la posibilidad de ver unidos dos conceptos como las nuevas tecnologías y el desarrollo energético sostenible, aspirando a funcionar veinticuatro horas al día con energías renovables” [1].

Suministrar energía 24 horas al día, 7 días a la semana, teniendo como fuentes el sol, el viento, la geotermia, etc, todas ellas fuentes intermitentes de energía; supone un desafío para el estado actual de la tecnología, pero al mismo tiempo, va a ayudar al desarrollo tecnológico de las distintas alternativas renovables. Si bien es cierto que todas las tecnologías actuales tienen cabida en el suministro de energía para el proyecto SKA: fotovoltaica, eólica, geotérmica, maremotriz,… la tecnología que cuenta con un poco de ventaja respecto al resto de las renovables es la solar térmica de concentración, principalmente por su capacidad de almacenar energía “fácilmente” en forma de calor y por la facilidad con que se pueden hibridar los sistemas actuales con bio-combustibles. Además, las diferentes tecnologías disponibles en la solar térmica de concentración, son capaces de cubrir el rango de potencias que va a demandar SKA y su variado equipamiento y sistemas:

  • Desde los pocos kW que demandaran los radiotelescopios parabólicos y los sistemas aislados, que pueden ser cubiertos, por ejemplo, con tecnología de discos parabólicos asociados a motores stirling o microturbinas solarizadas.
  • Pasando por el suministro de unas pocas centenas de kW, donde las micro-torres con receptores volumétricos de aire y turbinas de gas pueden encontrar su nicho.
  • Hasta los grandes centros de demanda de energía, que se podran apoyar en las tecnologías presentes en las plantas mas desarrolladas actualmente, tanto de captadores clindroparabólicos, como de sistemas de torre central; alcanzándose potencias de suministro de decenas (o centenas) de MW; al mismo tiempo que se incorporan sistemas de almacenamiento de energía de larga duración que permiten operar estas plantas 24 horas al día la mayor parte del año.

El papel que la Plataforma Solar de Almería asume dentro del proyecto es el de asesorar tecnológicamente al consorcio que desarrolla e implementa SKA para encontrar el mix adecuado de fuentes renovables de energía que suministre la electricidad que consumiran los diferentes equipos de SKA, tanto en zonas remotas y aisladas, como en grandes centros urbanos.

El proyecto SKA y sus requerimientos en materia de suministro eléctrico, suponen un gran handicap  para el empleo de fuentes renovables de electricidad, pero, al mismo tiempo, el compromiso del consorcio que lo desarrolla sobre el empleo de fuentes alternativas, servirá de apoyo para el avance  en soluciones viables, tanto técnica como económicamente, que, basandose en fuentes alternativas, aseguren una continuidad en el suministro eléctrico.

Fuentes:

[1] Lourdes Verdes-Montenegro, Valeriano Ruiz. Una mirada verde al cielo. El País 26 de Junio de 2012

www.skatelecope.org

www.iaa.es

www.psa.es

Etiquetas:

Proyecto CLAMBER “Castilla-La Mancha Bio-Economy Region”

Castilla-La Mancha está desarrollando el Proyecto “Castilla-La Mancha Bio-Economy Region” (Proyecto CLAMBER), que sienta las bases para convertir a esta región en el referente del sur de Europa dentro de la investigación relacionada con el aprovechamiento de la biomasa, teniendo en cuenta que es un gran productor de la misma. Cofinanciado por fondos FEDER, el CIEMAT realiza el asesoramiento científico-técnico del proyecto

 [Autor: Jose Miguel Oliva. Unidad Biocarburantes. Dpto Energía. Ciemat]

 El proyecto “CLAMBER Castilla-La Mancha Bio Economy Region” es un proyecto transversal de la Junta de Comunidades de Castilla-La Mancha, que se desarrolla en función del convenio firmado entre el IVICAM y el Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad. El Proyecto CLAMBER es una apuesta de la Comunidad de Castilla-La Mancha para convertir a esta región en el referente en el Sur de Europa en la Investigación relacionada con el aprovechamiento biotecnológico de las diferentes biomasas existentes en la región, así como nuevos cultivos y subproductos de la Industria y los residuos. Castilla-La Mancha quiere desarrollar una nueva Bioeconomía basada en el aprovechamiento biotecnológico de la materia orgánica renovable como alternativa más limpia y más sostenible a la actual economía dependiente de los recursos fósiles, que además una de las prioridades de la estrategia económica y tecnológica de la Unión Europea.

 El Proyecto CLAMBER se basa en dos actuaciones diferentes pero complementarias, que son, una primera: la construcción de un Centro de Investigación, en el que se albergará una biorefinería a escala de planta piloto, modular, versátil y con procesos innovadores, donde las empresas podrán realizar las pruebas y experimentos a una escala cercana a la real y donde se podrá formar al personal en las materias adecuadas a los nuevos requerimientos de la industria de base biológica; y una segunda: la convocatoria de proyectos, que bajo el formato innovador de la Compra Pública Precomercial, permitirá la realización de proyectos de I+D (Investigación y Desarrollo) encaminados a la óptima selección de las materias primas, a la mejora o desarrollo de nuevos bioprocesos, al desarrollo de nuevos bioproductos y a la investigación socio-económica de nuevos modelos de negocio, logística y otros retos tecnológicos. El Proyecto CLAMBER, que está siendo gestionado y desarrollado por el Instituto de la Vid y el Vino de Castilla-La Mancha (IVICAM), dispone de un presupuesto de 20M€ aportados por el Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad y por la Junta de Comunidades de Castilla-La Mancha y está cofinanciado con Fondos FEDER.

 El Instituto de la Vid y el Vino de Castilla-La Mancha (IVICAM) ha adjudicado, mediante licitación pública, distintos servicios para el proyecto CLAMBER. En el caso del servicio de asesoramiento científico-técnico para los años 2014 y 2015 se ha adjudicado al CIEMAT. CIEMAT está asesorando a IVICAM en lo referente a las actividades de concepción, diseño y construcción de la planta piloto de biorrefinería y a la definición, puesta en marcha y seguimiento del programa de I+D+i.

 La actividad de asesoramiento externo al proyecto CLAMBER se realiza, en su mayor parte, por personal de la Unidad de Biocarburantes, apoyados por científicos de otras Unidades del Departamento de Energía y del Departamento de Medioambiente del CIEMAT

El objetivo es que a finales de 2015 Castilla-La Mancha posea la primera  instalación piloto de biorrefinería en España, donde las empresas podrán realizar las pruebas y experimentos a una escala cercana a la real y donde se podrá formar al personal en las materias adecuadas a los nuevos requerimientos de la industria de base biológica.

Etiquetas:

New heat transfer fluids: Increasing performance in solar thermal power plants

Autor: José González-Instituto IMDEA Energía

Current commercial concentrating solar power (CSP) plants are still largely based on mineral oil parabolic trough technology, developed nearly 30 years ago, and molten-salt and direct steam generation towers [1]. At the same time, Fresnel technology has not fully developed its complete potential achieving a limited deployment and Stirling dish technology has not reached the required degree of development and cost-reduction in order to be competitive with respect to the other STE technologies. Parabolic trough power plants employ Rankine-cycle power blocks with low temperature (< 400ºC) steam turbines which operate with relatively low efficiencies (~35% when dry-cooled [2]), whilst central receiver CSP plants achieve higher temperatures, which have cycle efficiencies in region of 40%, leading to reduced costs. Despite this, both technologies have their associated drawbacks.

Molten-salt systems are limited to operating temperatures below 565 °C by the thermal stability of the salt itself, preventing the use of even more efficient, higher temperature power conversion cycles. Molten-salt systems also suffer from freezing problems if the salt temperature drops too low, resulting in high parasitic power consumption for heat-tracing. Direct steam systems are not limited in the temperatures they can achieve, as no intermediary heat transfer fluid is used. However, they typically operate with steam temperatures in the region of 535 °C and no cost-effective large-scale storage system has been developed for live steam. Use of this technology therefore negates the key advantages of solar thermal power: the ability to store energy [1]. As such, if the true potential of CSP technology is to be unlocked, new advances on heat transfer media (HTM) are needed that can both reach higher temperatures and easily be stored. Reaching higher temperatures is seen as key to future cost reductions, as higher temperatures lead to both higher power conversion efficiencies and increased storage densities, directly reducing the total cost of the solar collector field and the specific cost of the storage units. Recent reports points out that improvement in heat transfer fluids (HTFs) and storage solutions result in an expected LCOE reduction varying from 2.3% for Central Receiver to 5.6% for Parabolic Troughs CSP plants [3].

A wide range of alternative high-temperature HTM are being studied for use in CSP plants, including improved molten salts, liquid metals, gases, and solid particles [4]. In principle, the simplest solution would appear to be to develop new molten salt materials that are capable of resisting higher temperatures and/or have lower melting temperatures; in this way existing receiver technology could be used, reducing the required investment. However, in order to overcome the temperature limitations imposed by the nitrate salts currently used in CSP plants [5] it is necessary to switch to ternary, quaternary or even quinary mixtures based on nitrate, carbonates and chloride salts, which suffer from corrosion issues at high temperatures, significantly increasing maintenance costs [6]. Liquid metals, mainly based on sodium and lead and their alloys (NaK, lead-bismuth eutectic) are also being explored as HTF due to their high thermal conductivity and low viscosity. However, these fluids have important safety hazards. Alkali metals react with both air and water, thus leading to the risk for accidental fires. Lead-containing liquid metals require specific measures in order to avoid their toxicity by ingestion (proper ventilation, isolation and hygiene facilities). In addition, liquid metals have higher costs that molten salts currently used in CSP plants and they have lower heat capacities, which conduct to lower performance than molten salts as storage media [7].

Inert gases (e.g. air, helium, sCO2, etc.) are other alternative as HTF, eliminating the thermal decomposition and corrosion problems and even use them directly as working fluid in appropriate turbines or thermal engines. Thus intermediate heat exchangers are avoided increasing the energy available for electricity production. The use of air as the working fluid in solar tower power plants has been demonstrated since the early 1980s. Main advantages of using air are its availability from the ambient, environmentally-friendly characteristics, no troublesome phase change, higher working temperatures, easy operation and maintenance and high dispatchability. It is a suitable heat transfer fluid in desert areas, where water availability is scare. However its low heat transfer poses challenges for receiver design, while their low densities complicate the integration of energy storage [8]. Supercritical CO2 has recently attracted the solar community attention as HTF since it can operate at very high temperatures, provides suitable thermophysical properties related to the supercritical state and can be directly used as working fluid in sCO2 turbines [9].

The use of solid particles as the HTM is another option, capable of reaching temperatures of 1000 °C when ceramic particles are used [10]. Solid particle HTM are also ideally suited for storage applications, which can be easily implemented through simple bulk storage of hot particles. The solid particles are typically directly irradiated by the concentrated sunlight, allowing for very high heat fluxes as there is no interposing material to limit heat transfer. However, this approach leads to high heat losses (thermal efficiencies < 50% under real conditions [11]) and significant difficulties in controlling the flow of loose particles within the receiver. Within this approach, the dense particle suspension (DPS) is an alternative to the classical solid particle HTM, combining the good heat transfer properties of liquids and the ease of handling of gases with the high temperature properties of solid particles. The DPS consists of very small (μm-scale) particles which can be fluidized at low gas velocities and then be easily transported in a similar manner to a gas [12].

Inert gases (Air and sCO2) and solid particles (including DPS), which have the highest potential to operate at very high-temperatures between the aforementioned HTFs, are currently investigated in the High Temperature Processes Unit in the framework of national and international research projects (CM Alccones, PN SOlarO2, FP7 CSP2 and IRP STAGE-STE). The research focuses on the development of innovative solar receivers and reactors capable to handle these heat transfer fluids including testing at 15 kWth scale using high-flux solar simulators as well as the design of plant layouts in order to analyze the integration of these HTF (including specific components) and its impact on the CSP plant performances.

 

Figure 1. Scheme of a CSP plant using dense particles suspension as Heat Transfer Fluid [12]

 

[1] M. Romero, J. González-Aguilar, Solar Thermal CSP Technology, WIREs Energy and Environment, Volume 3 (2014), pp. 42 – 59.

[2] A. Fernández-García, E. Zarza, L. Valenzuela et al., Parabolic-Trough Solar Collectors and their Applications, Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Volume 14/7 (2010), pp. 1695 – 721.

[3] Future renewable energy costs: solar-thermal electricity, Eduardo Zarza, Emilien Simonot, Antoni Martínez, Thomas Winkler (Eds.) KIC InnoEnergy, 2015.

[4] C. Ho, B. Iverson, Review of High-Temperature Central Receiver Designs for Concentrating Solar Power, Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Volume 29 (2014), pp. 835–46.

[5] E. Freeman, The Kinetics of the Thermal Decomposition of Sodium Nitrate and of the Reaction between Sodium Nitrate and Oxygen, Journal of Physical Chemistry, Volume 60 (1956), pp. 1487–93.

[6] A. Kruizenga, 2012, Corrosion Mechanisms in Chloride and Carbonate Salts, Sandia National Laboratories (SAND2012-7594).

[7] J. Pacio, C. Singer, T. Wetzel, R. Uhlig, Thermodynamic evaluation of liquid metals as heat transfer fluids in concentrated solar power plants. Appl. Therm. Eng., Volume 60 (2013), pp. 295–302.

[8] M. Romero and E. Zarza. Concentrating solar thermal power. In: Kreith F., and Goswami Y., eds. Handbook of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. Chapter 21. Boca Raton, Florida: CRC Press, Taylor & Francis Group; 2007, pp. 1–98.

[9] Z. Ma, C. S. Turchi, Advanced supercritical carbon dioxide power cycle configurations for use in concentrating solar power systems, Golden, CO, USA; 2011 [NREL/CP-5500-50787].

[10] P. Falcone, J. Noring, J. Hruby, 1985, Assessment of a Solid Particle receiver for a High Temperature Solar Central Receiver System, SANDIA National Laboratories (SAND85-8208).

[11] P. Siegel, C. No, S. Khalsa et al., Development and Evaluation of a Prototype Solid Particle Solar Receiver: On-Sun Testing and Model Validation, Transactions of the ASME, Journal of Solar Energy Engineering, Volume 132 (2010).

[12] J. Spelling, A. Gallo, M. Romero, J. Gonzalez-Aguilar, A High-Efficiency Solar Thermal Power Plant using a Dense Particle Suspension as the Heat Transfer Fluid, Proceedings of the SolarPACES 2014 Conference, Beijing, China, September 16-19, 2014.

Etiquetas:

¿Cuánta energía tienen los posos del café?

En la actualidad diferentes grupos de investigación buscan a través de una materia prima residual y cotidiana en nuestras vidas – los posos de café – la obtención de energía.

Autor: Juan Antonio Melero Hernández-Grupo de Ingeniería Química y Ambiental de la Universidad Rey Juan Carlos

La escasez de los recursos fósiles y su elevado impacto ambiental como consecuencia de las emisiones de CO2 a la atmósfera está originando en la actualidad la búsqueda de alternativas energéticas más sostenibles y renovables. En este sentido la valorización energética de residuos de bajo coste es una alternativa muy interesante. Diferentes grupos de investigación estudían la obtención de energía a partir de los posos del café.

Muchos de nosotros necesitamos un café por la mañana para activarnos – pero además – el residuo sólido que dejamos tras la preparación de este café sirve para obtener una gran cantidad de energía en forma de biocarburantes y biocombustibles.

Pero, ¿cómo obtenemos energía de estos residuos del café?

Una vez el poso se seca para la eliminación del agua se le puede extraer mediante un disolvente orgánico selectivo una fracción de lípidos (grasas) que se puede transformar en biodiesel mediante un proceso convencional de transesterificación. Teniendo en consideración que cada año se producen en el mundo ocho millones de toneladas de posos y que estos posos contienen entre un 15-20 % de grasas en base seca – la cantidad de biodiesel a producir sería muy interesante – 1200 millones de litros por año –  Además este biodiesel tendría en su composición antioxidantes que aumentarían la estabilidad del combustible con respecto al biodiesel convencional obtenido de aceites vegetales.

Por otro lado, los mismos posos pueden contener azúcares que por fermentación darían lugar a bioetanol.

¿Y qué hacemos con el residuo sólido?

Pues también tenemos diferentes alternativas. Podemos someterlos a un proceso de pirólisis para producir un bio-aceite que pueda ser posteriormente valorizado como biocombustible o biocarburante.

Otra alternativa, que tiene gran interés sería que estos posos desengrasados y sin azúcar podrían ser prensados y pelletizados para ser alimentados a calderas de biomasa y producir la energía suficiente para la etapa de secado. O incluso estos pellets podrían ser comercializados y obtener un beneficio adicional, “los pelltes de posos de café poseen un elevado poder calorífico, más que los de leña”.

Materia

Papel

Madera Seca

Carbón

Posos de café

PC (MJ/kg)

13,5

14,4

15-27

24

No obstante, aunque la valorización energética de los posos del café es técnicamente viable, es necesario probar su viabilidad económica y testarlo en una planta comercial – pues un importante cuello de botella es el secado, los posos del café tienen una humedad entre el 60 y 70 % y la eliminación de esta agua puede requerir una elevada cantidad de energía si no se realiza de una forma eficiente.

Etiquetas: